INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY

Making the conversion of waste heat more comfortable in the human body, this monitoring device does it


Professor Wang Dong’s research group of Wuhan Textile University has developed an all-fiber integrated thermoelectric drive physiological signal monitoring device. A few days ago, the relevant research results were published in Advanced Fiber Materials.

All-fiber integrated thermoelectric drive physiological signal monitoring device composition, structure and circuit diagram. Photo courtesy of the research group

With the rapid development of wearable health devices, fiber-based self-powered sensor devices have attracted widespread attention because of their outstanding endurance and real-time monitoring capabilities. Among them, thermoelectric fabrics can use the temperature gradient between the human body and the environment to convert human waste heat into green energy, which has become a research hotspot in the field of self-energy sensing. However, most of the reported thermoelectric energy supply devices need to work in conjunction with heterogeneous components such as voltage amplifiers and integrated circuits, which affects their comfort and application prospects.

The all-fiber integrated thermoelectric drive physiological signal monitoring device consists of a thermoelectric fabric and a fiber-based organic electrochemical transistor, both consisting of the same lightweight, abrasion-resistant, sweat-resistant, and high-conductivity composite yarn. When the temperature difference between the human body and the environment is 2.2 K, the thermoelectric fabric can effectively drive the glucose sensor to work, achieve wide sensing interval, excellent anti-interference and reliable repeatability, and provide a new research idea for large-area integrated homogeneous self-powered biochemical sensing fabric.

In this study, at a small temperature gradient (2.2K) between the human body and the external environment, the fiber-based organic electrochemical transistor was successfully driven only by changing the number of series connections and access direction of the gate-thermoelectric fabric thermoelectric unit.

The team was the first to use integrated weaving technology to prepare an all-fiber integrated thermoelectric drive physiological signal monitoring device with an air permeability rate of up to 300.29 mm/s, which provides a new idea for constructing soft and comfortable wearable self-powered energy sensors.

It is reported that Qing Xing, a doctoral student of Wuhan Textile University and Deakin University in Australia, is the first author of the paper, Chen Huijun, a master’s student of Wuhan Textile University, is the co-first author of this paper, and professors Wang Dong and Li Mufang of Wuhan Textile University are co-corresponding authors. (Source: China Science News, Wen Caifei, Zheng Ting)

Related paper information:https://doi.org/10.1007/s42765-023-00258-8



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