CHEMICAL SCIENCE

Record! Scientists design and develop highly efficient and stable perovskite bifacial miniature components


On April 20, 2023, Professor Jinsong Huang’s team at the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill published an article titled “Design optimization of bifacial perovskite minimodules for improved efficiency” in the journal Nature Energy and stability” new paper. The research group solved the above challenges through the optimization of a series of integrated strategies, demonstrating the design and development of perovskite bifacial micromodules with record high efficiency and stability.

The corresponding author of the paper is Professor Huang Jinsong, and the first author is Gu Hangyu.

The module efficiency of perovskite solar cells is still far below their small devices and market expectations. Bifacial solar modules have been shown to be effective in increasing the module’s power generation density (PGD) by collecting sunlight reflected and scattered from the back, depending on albedo and installation conditions, such as the mounting height, density and surrounding environment of the solar panels. Albedo, defined as the proportion of sunlight reflected from the surface, determines the amount of additional radiation and productivity gain to which the bifacial module is exposed. Average albedo has been measured to 0.2 or higher in many geographic regions, and outdoor performance testing of bifacial modules has shown significantly higher yields than monofacial modules. The market share of silicon’s bifacial solar modules has risen rapidly in recent years, but the efficiency and stability research of bifacial perovskite cells and modules still lags far behind that of single-sided cells and modules.

Achieving efficient large-area double-sided perovskite solar modules requires solving a series of key problems, such as high resistance loss caused by transparent electrodes on the back, insufficient absorption of red and NIR light, and local water vapor damage to perovskites caused by ALD SnO2 protective layer during preparation.

In this study, Professor Jinsong Huang’s team at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill solved the above challenges through a series of comprehensive strategy optimizations, demonstrating the design and development of perovskite bifacial micromodules with record high efficiency and stability. The small-area bifacial solar cells achieved an energy generation density of more than 26.4 mW cm−2 at 1 sunlight and 0.2 albedo (equivalent to 26.4% efficiency), and the micro-modules of double-sided perovskites achieved Aperture efficiencies of 20.2% and 15.0%, respectively (the steady-state conversion efficiency certified by the National Energy Laboratory NREL was 19.2% on the front side and 14.1% on the back). The aperture area of more than 20 cm2 translates to a power generation density (PGD) of more than 23 mW cm−2 at 1 sunlight and 0.2 albedo, well above the highest efficiency of certified single-sided modules. The double-sided miniature module retains 97% of the initial efficiency under 6,000 hours of continuous front 1 sunlight and 6-10% reflected light behind it.

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This study is the first to realize bifacial modules that exceed the energy generation density of single-sided perovskite cells and micro-modules, and is an important research in the field of perovskite photovoltaic and bifacial modules. (Source: Science Network)

Related paper information:https://doi.org/10.1038/s41560-023-01254-3



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